West Street Gallery

May 3
 
Van Hanos
May 7 - June 4, 2011, opening reception: May 7, 7-9 PM 
West Street Gallery is pleased to present the debut solo exhibition of work by New York-based artist Van Hanos.
This exhibition is a selection from a set of 33 oil paintings on linen created as gifts for friends, colleagues, and mentors who have had a formative effect on the artist. Each will receive a work at the end of the show’s run. The paintings make tribute to people and dialogues stretching back to the artist’s childhood; some the artist has not made contact with in years.
Intentionally “attractive” and warm in tone, these paintings are in part devotional, while articulating a range of rules and attitudes. The works correspond loosely and variously to their subjects.
Each image is a detail of a painting previously made by the artist. This gesture continues the artist’s ongoing effort to scramble his signature while upholding the singularity of painting. “Funny… This show isn’t presenting any new imagery,” says the artist. “[Making details] can be a way of not making paintings”. He cites Bob Dylan’ s frequent inclusion of two versions of the same song on one LP, a process that separates singer from songwriter, and the process of songwriting. Instead, Hanos focuses on the time and difference implicit to the labor of painting. 

Van Hanos

May 7 - June 4, 2011, opening reception: May 7, 7-9 PM 

West Street Gallery is pleased to present the debut solo exhibition of work by New York-based artist Van Hanos.

This exhibition is a selection from a set of 33 oil paintings on linen created as gifts for friends, colleagues, and mentors who have had a formative effect on the artist. Each will receive a work at the end of the show’s run. The paintings make tribute to people and dialogues stretching back to the artist’s childhood; some the artist has not made contact with in years.

Intentionally “attractive” and warm in tone, these paintings are in part devotional, while articulating a range of rules and attitudes. The works correspond loosely and variously to their subjects.

Each image is a detail of a painting previously made by the artist. This gesture continues the artist’s ongoing effort to scramble his signature while upholding the singularity of painting. “Funny… This show isn’t presenting any new imagery,” says the artist. “[Making details] can be a way of not making paintings”. He cites Bob Dylan’ s frequent inclusion of two versions of the same song on one LP, a process that separates singer from songwriter, and the process of songwriting. Instead, Hanos focuses on the time and difference implicit to the labor of painting.